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POST QUALIFYING DIPLOMA IN COUNSELLING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

POST QUALIFYING DIPLOMA IN COUNSELLING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

ABC

This course is endorsed by the Awarding Body Consortium.




Continuing Professional Development
POST QUALIFYING DIPLOMA in COUNSELLING CHILDREN and YOUNG PEOPLE
Course Prospectus
Swindon & St Austell 2016-17

Delivered under the ABC Quality Licence Scheme, this highly regarded course has been extended to meet the new BACP standards for CPD training in Counselling Children and Young People

Designed for: Qualified counsellors, 2nd year Diploma students and other children’s professionals wishing to specialise in counselling children and young people

Length: 9 weekends over 9 months (18 days)

Assessment: 4 essays 2000-3000 words (externally moderated) 

Cost: £1695. Includes 1st year’s membership of closed online support network for course graduates

Contact details: info@imokyoureok.co.uk  /  07810 441 896

Address: 7 Dennison Avenue, St Austell, PL25 3HD  

Who is this course for?

The course is designed for Counselling Diploma graduates, final year Counselling Diploma students, those already professionally counselling children and young people, or for anyone otherwise appropriately qualified. Its aim is to deepen the specialist knowledge, skills and clinical governance that will support effective, safe therapeutic practice with children and young people between 5 and 25 years of age. The value of rigorous age-focussed training is highlighted by the BACP’s new guidelines on the need for specialist knowledge when counselling under-18s.

NEW!


  • This well-established and highly acclaimed course has now also been extended to include an additional Unit (4), to address the growing demands on young people’s counselling services to support the high number of young people with emerging mental health issues, presenting through self-harm, suicidal ideation and high risk behaviours. 
 
  • Successful completion of the course will include one year’s access to a closed online community of past and present course graduates offering networking support, resources, news and webinars.


Course location and dates

SWINDON, WILTSHIRE    

Location: The Willows Centre, 11 Prospect Place, Old Town, Swindon, SN1 3LQ

The course will take place at weekends: 10:00-17:00 on Saturday & Sunday. 

Course dates: 

Group interview day: Saturday 2nd July, 2016 (The Willows Centre, Swindon)

Plus the following weekends in 2016:-
Oct 1/2 
Oct 29/30
Nov 26/7

In 2017:-
Jan 7/8
Feb 4/5
March 4/5
April 8/9
May 6/7
June 10/11

ST AUSTELL, CORNWALL

Location:- The Pattern Hall, Foundry Parc, Charlestown, St Austell, PL25 3FW

The course will take place at weekends: 10:00-17:00 on Saturday & Sunday. 

Course dates: 

Group interview day: Saturday 9nd July, 2016 (Pattern Hall, St Austell)

Plus the following weekends in 2016:-
Sept 24/25 
Oct 22/23
Nov 19/20

In 2017:-
Jan 14/15
Feb 11/12
March 11/12
May 13/14
June 17/18
July 15/16

Application, selection process & requirements

Applicants should have completed a Diploma in Counselling (minimum of 450 hours of training) or be in their final year of a Diploma or equivalent. Students will only be awarded the Diploma in Counselling Children and Young People, following completion of all the course criteria and upon production of a valid Diploma in Counselling.

On receipt of your application you will be invited to interview with the Course Director in either Swindon or St Austell. The first round of interviews is due to take place in July, 2016. However, all applications are welcomed and seriously considered up to the course start dates, provided that there is still a place available (16 people per course). The interview process includes the opportunity for you to find out whatever you may wish to know about the course content and methods of teaching and assessment. An offer of a place will follow a successful interview and receipt of two suitable references. Due to the vulnerable nature of the client group, students will also be required to submit a current Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service certificate on completion of the course.
 
Please be aware that you will be required to be working with at least 3 young people for the duration of the course due to the need to be able to draw upon real client work for the purpose of the assignments. Also, due to the vulnerable nature of the client group, students will need to submit a current Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service certificate on completion of the course.

Learning and Assessment

Teaching and learning take place through a series of lectures, seminars, experiential workshops, group discussion and private study. The course is split into 4 units, each assessed at Level 7, through a 2000-3000 word essay which is externally moderated. Most participants will have either a level 4 or 5 counselling Diploma (or be in their 2nd year Counselling Diploma). This means that while course weekends are based around knowledge-based and experiential learning activities, as a post-qualifying course, the expectation is for a substantial amount of self-guided learning around the assignment themes – in order to get the most from the course and to broaden and deepen participants’ capacity to offer effective therapeutic counselling to children and young people. 

Successful completion of the course will offer a maximum of 108 hours CPD training and a Post Qualifying Diploma in Counselling Children and Young People under the Awarding Body Consortium Quality Licence Scheme (ABC).

Payment

The total course cost is £1695. 
To secure a place there is a deposit of £255 – payable upon acceptance of a place offer.  

Payment option A: In full by cheque or by BACS transfer by September 30th at the reduced cost of £1650 (£255 deposit + £1395) 

Payment option B: 8 x monthly instalments of £180 ending no later than May 31, 2017. (£255 deposit + £1440)

The course fee will cover tuition costs and essay marking. Referred essays will carry a fee of £50 for each essay referred.

Course units outline 

Unit 1 (weekends 1 & 2) provides an historical background to counselling services for young people and how these have been affected by changing socio-economic and legislative factors. It aims to help you to develop your own philosophical basis for this work by examining the child’s place in society, family systems, child development, Attachment and Neuroscience as well as issues such as equality and access to services, confidentiality, the law and the child-counsellor relationship.

Unit 2 (weekends 3 & 4) critically examines a range of counselling models and their relevance and effectiveness for working with different age groups, needs & abilities in different settings i.e. primary and secondary schools, colleges, special schools, 16+ GP referrals, private counselling etc.

Unit 3 (weekends 5 & 6) explores common presenting issues e.g. anger, anxiety, bereavement, bullying, school phobia, divorce and trauma. It also provides the opportunity to experience and share a wide range of creative interventions suitable for supporting these issues and helping children and young people to develop their resilience.

Unit 4 (weekends 7, 8 & 9) examines some of the complex emerging mental health issues being increasingly brought by children and young people into counselling e.g. self-harm, suicidal ideation, cyber-bullying, online grooming and high-risk behaviours. It will explore assessment, appropriate interventions and referral / liaison with other professionals in the best interests of a young person. It also includes the thorough exploration of effective self-care to mitigate the risk of vicarious trauma to ourselves.

Who will be leading the course?

Lisa Nel BA(Comb) Hons, PGCE, A.Dip. Int. Couns., Dip. Couns. Children & Adolescents, MBACP (Accred) 

Lisa is a trainer and therapist with 28 years’ experience in teaching, counselling and training. She is also Director of I’m OK, You’re OK, a Social Enterprise founded to increase access to mental health support for children, young people, families and staff. I’m OK, You’re OK has developed robust age-appropriate models of counselling in primary and secondary schools in the South West, as well as staff well-being workshops, family work, supervision and a range of CPD training for people a wide range of helping roles.

Her teaching and training are motivated by a great enthusiasm to share the best therapeutic practice for mental health and well-being and a commitment to rigorous training for everyone counselling the growing number of children and young people needing support. She is also passionate about ‘practising what we preach’ through self-compassion and effective self-care!  

See http://www.imokyoureok.co.uk/  for further details and information 

During 2016-17 the course is being run in association with course originator, well known freelance trainer, writer and child Psychotherapist, Lynn Martin (MSc. M.A B.Ed, CIPTS. CTA(P) CIP Dip.Sup. MNCH(Acc) UKCP Reg) founder and Director of Quality Training UK. After many years of passionate dedication to delivering this rigorous and highly acclaimed course, Lynn is now handing over the mantle to Lisa.

See http://www.qualitytraininguk.com/index.php for further details and information
 
Course units: details of content & assessment 

Throughout the course we will bear in mind the importance of Child Development, Attachment Theory and the impact that poor attachment styles has on children in all areas of their lives. We will also consider the latest understanding of Neuroscience and how we can use this knowledge in our work with young clients.

Unit 1: provides an historical background to counselling services for young people and how these have been affected by changing socio-economic and legislative factors. It aims to help you to develop your own philosophical basis for this work by examining the child’s place in society, family systems, child development, Attachment and Neuroscience as well as issues such as equality and access to services, confidentiality, the law and the child-counsellor relationship.

We start by examining the child's place in our society and the huge impact upon their lives of changes within family and community structures, as well as other phenomena such as social media and financial recession. It emphasises the vital importance of having a thorough understanding of child development, attachment patterns and relevant Neuroscience.

Unit 1 will enable students to develop a philosophical base for their counselling practice with children and young people.

Intentions:  

Within this unit it is intended that participants will:

  • i) Explore the growth of Youth Culture in the post war years and the ever changing place of the child in contemporary society.
  • ii) Consider the importance of counselling for young people as a discreet service, based on reports published in the last 60 years.
  • iii) Examine issues of confidentiality, accessibility, choice, the Children Act, equal opportunities and the child - counsellor relationship.
  • iv) Critically analyse the post war ideologies of childhood and their implications for the way children are addressed.
  • v) Critically analyse the ideologies of childhood embodied in reports on counselling children and the implications for the ways services are conceptualised, organised and funded.
  • vi) Explore the impact upon children and young people of cultural, social and economic changes within family and community structures.
  • vii)  Explore the relevance to mental health of other phenomena such as social media, consumerist culture and financial recession.
  • viii) Refresh the vital underpinning knowledge of child developmental stages, Attachment Theory and relevant Neuroscience.
  • ix) Analyse and critically evaluate theories about what differentiates counselling children from counselling adults.

Pre-course reading (provided upon acceptance onto the course): 

  • Tyler's research report No.1 1978 
  • The Thompson report 1982. 
  • The World Health Organisation report 1978. 
  • The Children Act 1989 
  • The Good Childhood Report 2015– Children’s Society (Summary)
  • Emerging legislation on Child Mental Health, 2015-16

Content:

The content will include:

  • The evolution of Youth Culture from post-war to present day  
  • Cultural diversity and change, migration and the wide range of different family structures and parenting 
  • Child development, Attachment Theory and relevant Neuroscience
  • Family systems theory and the child's place within the family 
  • The impact of social media, technology and other factors e.g. target-driven culture and consumerism upon the lives of young people in areas such as sexuality, education, resilience, mental & physical health, human inter-action and future expectations 
  • The rise in mental health problems among children and young people 
  • Access for children and young people to face to face counselling services. Impact of factors such as geography, inequality, culture etc. The increase in online and telephone services 
  • How different settings/ contexts impact the nature of support e.g. number of sessions, info sharing etc. 
  • The boundaries of confidentiality, safeguarding, ethics and the law 
  • Differentiation between counselling children and counselling adults 
  • The child-counsellor relationship 

There will be opportunities for students to examine issues other than those listed above, as relevant to their work situations

Assessment:

An essay of 2,000 - 3,000 words to illustrate the importance of having a philosophical basis for counselling practice with children and young people 

Essay title: ‘Describe how the child’s place in society and other wider issues related to counselling children and young people have affected your work with a particular client.’

Unit 2: Weekends 3 & 4 will examine the effectiveness of different counselling models in a range of different counselling settings. 

We shall consider a range of different models of counselling and their relevance for working with different age groups and abilities in particular settings such as primary and secondary schools, Further Education, Higher Education, special schools and private counselling.

Unit 2 will enable students to critically assess the usefulness of different approaches in their working practice.

Intentions:

Within this unit it is intended that participants will:

  • i) Critically analyse a range of different counselling modalities for different settings when counselling children and young people.
  • ii) Critically evaluate the application and effectiveness of different models of counselling children in their practice. 

Content

The content will include:

  • School counselling services for early years in infant & junior settings 
  • School counselling in Secondary schools / Tertiary (FE/HE) 
  • Working with children in specialist schools e.g. pupil referral units, special schools as well as with individuals in mainstream education with specific needs e.g. autism, ADHD
  • Working together with GPS, CAMHS, MARU (Multi-Agency Referral Unit) and Children’s Services
  • Private counselling

Critical evaluation of some of the key models of counselling used in therapeutic work with children and young people:

  • Play Therapy
  • Art, Music and Drama Therapies
  • Person Centred Counselling 
  • Existential Counselling 
  • Transactional Analysis 
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy 
  • Solution focused / Brief Therapy 

There will be opportunities for students to examine areas other than those listed above, as relevant to their work situations.

Assessment:

An essay of 2,000 - 3,000 words to illustrate the importance of having a thorough theoretical underpinning to our counselling practice.

Essay title: ‘Compare and contrast two different models of Counselling and assess their appropriateness and effectiveness within the particular counselling setting(s) in which they are used.’ 


Unit 3: Weekends 5 & 6 will explore some common presenting issues brought by children and young people into counselling. We will also share a range of creative interventions suitable for supporting these specific issues.

Unit 3 will enable students to understand the specific needs and difficulties that can arise for young people when dealing with life events and assess the usefulness of a variety of different interventions in their working practice.

Intentions:

Within this unit it is intended that participants will:

  • i) Explore some of the specific issues brought into counselling by children such as anger, anxiety, bereavement, divorce, sexuality, bullying and school phobia.
  • ii) Examine these issues affecting children and analyse the implications of how they are likely to experience them.
  • iii) Explore and critically evaluate a range of creative strategies for use in counselling children in general.
  • iv) Explore and critically evaluate a range of strategies for counselling children in relation to the specific issues.
  • v) Consider and experience a range of creative interventions for working with children.
  • vi) Consider the age appropriateness of a variety of interventions.
  • vii) Analyse and critically evaluate theories about what differentiates counselling children from counselling adults. 

Content:

The content will include:

  • How children and young people are affected by loss
  • Bereavement: stages of grief and complex grief
  • Divorce/ separation/ blended families
  • Anxiety: school phobia; performance anxiety 
  • Anger, rage, shame and bullying
  • Trauma and its impact - the breadth of potential causes (including abuse and neglect)
  • Sexuality and gender issues
  • Somatic interventions e.g. grounding, breath-work, centering, meditation, tapping, shaking, laughter and other methods of supporting emotional regulation 
  • Therapeutic play
  • Using metaphor/ dreams/ visualisations / Nature in therapy
  • Sand play
  • Using art, music, dance & drama in therapy
  • Story telling & creating; poetry and life story work  

There will be opportunities for students to examine specialist areas other than those listed above, as relevant to their work situations.

Assessment:

An essay of 2,000 - 3,000 words which focuses upon ONE of the issues explored in this unit, e.g. loss, anxiety, anger, trauma (etc.) and how the student has used creative interventions to support this.

Essay title: ‘Describe your understanding of one particular area of emotional difficulty experienced by children and young people, and critically evaluate your use of creative interventions to support children and young people with this specific issue.'


Unit 4: Weekends 7, 8 & 9 will explore working with higher risk emerging mental health issues, exploring what these are, risk assessment, monitoring own competency and self-care as well as decision making around referral and appropriate information sharing/ joint working in the best interests of the child.

It will look at some of the more complex issues and behaviours being increasingly brought by children and young people into counselling e.g. self-harm, suicidal ideation, social media vulnerabilities, eating and body disorders, sexuality, addictive and high-risk behaviours.

We shall consider emerging legislation, assessment means and criteria, the context(s) in which we work and monitoring our own competency to support particular young clients and decision making around if/ when/ to whom referral may be necessary in their best interests.

Through discussion and case histories, we shall also explore a range of interventions for working as safely and effectively as possible with these presenting issues. We shall look at our own risk of vicarious traumatisation and strategies for effective self-care. 

Finally we will explore safe endings, including our own.

Intentions:

Within this unit it is intended that participants will:

  • i) Explore higher risk issues arising such as self-harm, suicidal ideation, social media vulnerabilities, eating and body disorders, sexuality, addictive and high-risk behaviours.
  • ii) Analyse the tools for assessing the safety of a young person
  • iii) Consider and experience a range of interventions for working with very vulnerable children 
  • iv) Reflect further through discussion upon appropriate information sharing and safeguarding referrals
  • v) Examine our own competency and the impact of the context e.g. main stream Primary, Secondary or College student counselling, private counselling, pupil referral units, special schools (etc.) upon what support we are able to offer 
  • vi) Understand the risks & signs of vicarious traumatisation to ourselves. Explore the importance of and personal obstacles to effective self-care. 
  • vii) Safe and positive endings – including our own on this course 



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